Home News General Next-gen Royal Enfield Classic to get revised instrument cluster, switchgear

Next-gen Royal Enfield Classic to get revised instrument cluster, switchgear

We know that Royal Enfield is working on a next-gen Classic 350/500 motorcycle. It was around 10 days ago when an uncamouflaged test mule was spotted revealing a few details of the new model. Now, there are some new spy shots that reveal the updated instrument cluster and switchgear.

2020 Royal Enfield Classic instrument cluster spy shot
Updated instrument cluster

It can be clearly seen in the pictures that the instrument cluster of the next-gen Royal Enfield Classics will be partly digital. It will have a conventional speedometer that will show speeds in both kph and mph. Below it will be a small digital display which should contain information like odometer, trip meter, perhaps a gear shift indicator, turn signal indicator, and the likes. We also spot a dummy cover on the right side which RE might use for something or might not.

2020 Royal Enfield Classic switchgear spy shot
New LHS switchgear

Apart from the new instrument cluster, RE is also going to update the switchgear. On the right side of the handlebar, we spot a pretty cool rotary-type engine kill switch which will also act as the ignition switch and will be of recoil-type. A similar setup is seen on the left side of the handlebar for switching between high and low beam and also using the recoil function for the pass feature.

2020 Royal Enfield Classic switchgear spy shot
New RHS switchgear

There’s also a small button located on the front side of this switchgear. We don’t know what it does. Perhaps, it could be used to toggle between the information on the small digital display or maybe to turn off the ABS? What say?

As of now, there is no further information about this next-gen Royal Enfield Classic. However, one thing’s for sure, it is going to be BS6 compliant and for that RE will need to make some serious changes in the engine which might lead to a slight bump in power and torque numbers. We don’t know. Let’s wait, right?