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Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R recalled to fix backfiring issue that could cause a fire

The Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R has been recalled. Kawasaki has issued a recall for the Ninja ZX-10R to fix an issue in the ECU programming. The current ECU  programming allows room for backfiring, which could in a worst-case scenario lead to a fire. Now that is quite a serious issue.

2020 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R
2020 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R

The Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R is one of the best litre-class superbikes out there. The supersport motorcycle has a huge fan base. It is one of the most engaging motorcycles to ride as it handles like a dream. Its liquid-cooled, 998cc, inline-four engine produces 200bhp and 115Nm, also making it one among the most-powerful motorcycles out there.

It comes with a comprehensive electronics package and top-shelf components. Everything considered, it is a dream machine to many and hence many went ahead and bought it. We’re sure owning the bike must have been a hoot. Now though, there appears to be a slight glitch.

All models of the Ninja ZX-10R sold between 2019 and 2020 in America are affected by this problem. The main problem with the code programmed into the ECU of the motorcycle. The current programming allows for the engine to backfire while shifting up and down using the quickshifter.

Repetitive backfiring could damage or break the air suction valve which is a component in the exhaust system designed to reduce the emissions produced by the engine. If the air suction valve is broken and the engine continues backfiring, it could produce excessive heat, in-turn causing other components near the exhaust system to melt.

2019 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R HD wallpapers
2019 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R HD wallpapers

When this happens, there is a chance for the motorcycle to catch fire, therefore making this issue quite a serious one. All 1,529 Ninja ZX-10Rs sold in the USA are affected by this issue and hence all owners will be notified by Kawasaki dealerships.

Once the customer brings the bike in, engineers at the dealership will reprogram the ECU and write a new code into it. Engineers will also check the exhaust system for any damage to the air suction valve. If found damaged, it will be replaced free of cost. This of course applies to the stock exhaust system.

Those using an aftermarket full exhaust system wouldn’t have to deal with this risk. There’s no information on whether this issue exists with motorcycles sold across the world or with just those sold in the USA. For now though, the recall has been issued only in America. Watch this space to know if it would affect India and other countries as well.